Dawid Kobiałka, Mikołaj Kostyrko, Kornelia Kajda


Abstract

Many sites related to the First World War are forgotten and neglected in today’s Poland. This paper shortly presents the ways of practicing “conflict archaeology” in Poland and it discusses results of the non-invasive archaeological survey conducted in Tuchola and Czersk, places where during the First World War Germans built and run prisoners of war camps. In the article the material remains of the camps that have survived in the local landscapes till the present are analyzed. Both sites are at the same time remembered and forgotten by local communities. This paper tries to account for oblivion as an inherent part of local landscapes that adds a unique value to them.

Prisoners of War Camps structures in Tuchola Poland
Contemporary landscape of the former PoW camp in Tuchola: an integration of different types of data. Photo by Dawid Kobiałka, Drawing: Mikołaj Kostyrko
The Prisoners of War cemetery in Czersk. Photo by Dawid Kobiałka
The Prisoners of War cemetery in Czersk. Photo by Dawid Kobiałka

 

The full article available at SpringerLink International Journal of Historical Archaeology

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Reusing the abstract under the Springer License

All photos published with the Authors’ permission.

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One thought on “The Great War and Its Landscapes Between Memory and Oblivion: the Case of Prisoners of War Camps in Tuchola and Czersk, Poland

  1. Authors’ analysis is based on historical documents, LiDAR derivatives and artifacts. They call for a more balanced and sustainable approach toward social and material memory. They main conclusion is that oblivion is an inherent part of local landscapes and that it adds a unique value to them. The oblivion also enables people to experience things in their intimate being – thingness. They believe that the social oblivion of the camps allows us to reveal material memories of the Great War heritage.

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